Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Jim Rogers - Talks FUTURE for the ECONOMY of CHINA



Tuesday, May 5, 2015

Gold Buying Opportunity Has Still Not Come


After a one-year hiatus from Kitco News, Jim Rogers joins Daniela Cambone to share his thoughts on the market, specifically gold. “Gold has its own mind,” he says. “Sometimes it moves with the dollar, sometimes it doesn’t.” Rogers says he’s not so concerned with the daily fluctuations and adds he is still waiting on a buying opportunity. Looking east, Rogers says he is bullish on the Chinese economy despite recent weaker economic data and continued easing in the country. “I’m bullish on the Chinese markets. My largest stock positions are in Asia - China, Japan, Russia,” he says. “I see more real estate bankruptcies in China, there’s a lot of debt buildup in China. But at the moment, I’m still there and I even bought more last week.” Rogers also has a keen interest in the Russian stock market. Tune in now to get his thoughts on the Federal Reserve and why he thinks they may not even raise interest rates this year.

- Source, Kitco News

Saturday, April 4, 2015

If North and South Korea Unite

If North and South Korea unite, Japan will be faced with a huge new competitor, much more powerful a competitor than South Korea is right now. There will be a country of seventy-five to eighty million people right on the Chinese border, with lots of cheap, disciplined labor and natural resources in the north and lots of capital, expertise, and management capabilities in the south. Such a country would run circles around Japan. The cost of doing business in Japan is high and getting higher. Among other things, the Japanese do not have a lot of cheap labor anymore.

Japan is against unification for obvious reasons. I am not sure why America is against it, other than simple inertia. For American bureaucrats, who are intellectually lethargic, characteristically slow to change their thinking, a divided Korea is a way of life. Several thousand US soldiers are stationed in South Korea — it is something of an industry, and an entire bureaucracy subsists on the industry's continuity.

Where are the investment opportunities in North Korea? one might ask. I invest in markets, and there is no market there, so I would have to find companies, maybe Chinese or other Asian companies, that would benefit from the opening up of North Korea. I do not know of such companies right now. But North Korea is ripe for factories, hotels, restaurants, pretty much anything at this point. North Korea has nothing — no mobile phones, no Internet. Like Myanmar, the country lacks everything from the most basic goods and services to the highest technology. Yes, Myanmar has the Internet, but very little penetration. Yes, both countries have soap, but not nearly enough. Yes, both countries have electricity, but not nearly enough.

Tourism, I believe, presents investment opportunities in North Korea. There are only twenty-five million North Koreans, so there is not going to be a big boom in their traveling the world, but there is probably going to be a big boom in South Koreans visiting North Korea. There will be a staggering business in marriage, because there is a huge shortage of girls in South Korea. South Korean men can look for wives in Los Angeles or Queens, but the main source of Korean brides is going to be North Korea. The north does not suffer from the demographic problem that plagues the South.

I am dying to find a way to invest in both North Korea and Myanmar. The major changes in these two countries are among the most exciting things I see right now, looking to the future.

- Source, Business Insider

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Here's Why I'm Dying To Invest In North Korea

In 2007, my wife Paige and I received permission to visit North Korea. I wanted to go there because I sensed that changes were coming.

Now I am not a tour group kind of person. I like to make my own way and create my own itinerary, to decide where to go and what to eat. That is not an option in North Korea, where we had government minders every minute we were there. Walking down the main thoroughfare in Pyongyang, I saw a barbershop, and because I needed a haircut, I ducked inside, where an old man sitting on a stool stood up in shock when I started pantomiming the use of scissors with my hands. I was summarily pulled outside by one of our minders. A haircut, he assured me, was not on the agenda.

By 2007, I think, only something like three hundred Americans had been to North Korea since before the Second World War — there was some strange statistic like that. Virtually no Americans had been allowed to go there since General Douglas MacArthur's troops went across in the early 1950s.

It was clear to me that the North Koreans knew that their country needed changing. And it was not hard to understand why. All the North Korean generals, as young officers, thirty years ago, were sent to places like Beijing, Moscow, and Shanghai. Today they go as generals and see the changes that have taken place, and when they return to Pyongyang they say to themselves: Look at what is going on in those places, and now take a look at where we live — nothing has happened here, this place is still a disaster.

The country's supreme leader, Kim Jong-un, was educated at a private school in Switzerland. It is very unlikely that a guy who is thirty years old and spent his formative years in Europe is going to come back and say, "Boy, I really like this, with no bars, no entertainment, no cars, no nothing."

These men have been exposed to the outside world, and they know what is going on there. And in my view that is why North Korea is about to open up. And when it does, it will be a formidable player on the world stage. The Chinese are already pouring in. Up in the northwest, they are building new bridges connecting the two countries. There are new trade zones up there. So change is happening.


- Source, Business Insider

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Is The Worst Over for Crude Oil?

The US asked Saudi Arabia to dump crude oil, which added pressure on Iran and Russia. So, the fall in crude prices is more political than economic while US crude supplies have gone up. Everywhere around the world, crude reserves have gone down and I don't know till when these artificial supplies of crude will continue. Now, if Iran and Russia come to a deal with the West, crude prices will start going up. Crude prices have to do more with the global political development than anything else.

- Jim Rogers via a recent ET interview

Thursday, March 26, 2015

What can India do to retain the interest among foreign investors?

India must open its economy more. The major problem about the economy is it's overprotected, and it's one of the reasons why India is not growing as fast as it should be. To buy Indian shares is not easy as it's overprotected and there is a need to change. The authorities should make the currency convertible and the markets open and get away with a lot of regulations and control. Otherwise, India will never live up to its potential.

- Source, Jim Rogers via ET

Monday, March 23, 2015

Signs of global investors losing patience with India

The current mood of global investors about Indian stock and bond markets is that they are happy. They are confident about India as there is a lot of money floating around. It's the first time in world history that all major central banks of the world are printing lots of money. Japan, Europe, Great Britain, the US are printing money, and that has never happened before, thus there is a huge amount of liquidity. A lot of things are going around the global stock markets, including India. That's why the mood is wonderful among foreign investors. But, one should remember that it's all artificial and cannot last for long. The next time we are going to have an economic problem in the world, it's going to be much worse because there is artificial money floating around, the debt levels of countries are rising while central banks are also managing much more debt. There is going to be much more pain for all of us in the end if artificial money keeps floating like this.

- Source, Jim Rogers via ET

Friday, March 20, 2015

Gold Correction to Continue Into 2015


This week, we are joined by none other than Mr. Jim Rogers. Jim was the co-founder of the legendary Quantum Fund, which he ran together with George Soros, some 35 years ago. Jim has been very successful as an investor, and has many bestselling books to his name. Joining us from Singapore, where he lives with his wife and family, we were able to get his opinion on many of the big questions facing investors today.

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